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A Guide to Hisaye Yamamoto's Seventeen Syllables: Summary, Analysis, and Pdf Download



# Hisaye Yamamoto Seventeen Syllables Pdf Download ## Introduction - Introduce Hisaye Yamamoto as one of the first Japanese American authors to achieve critical and commercial success after World War II - Mention her collection of short stories titled Seventeen Syllables and Other Stories - Explain the main theme of the collection: the cultural conflicts between the first and second generation of Japanese Americans - State the main purpose of the article: to provide a summary and analysis of the most anthologized story in the collection, "Seventeen Syllables" - Provide a thesis statement: "Seventeen Syllables" is a powerful story that explores the issues of language, communication, identity, and gender in the context of Japanese American history and culture. ## Summary of "Seventeen Syllables" - Summarize the plot of the story: Rosie Hayashi is a young Japanese American girl who lives with her parents on a tomato farm in California before World War II. She struggles to connect with her mother, Tome, who writes haiku poems under a pen name. Rosie also develops a romance with Jesus Carrasco, a Mexican American boy who works on the farm. Rosie's mother reveals her tragic past and warns Rosie not to marry. - Highlight the main characters and their roles: Rosie Hayashi (the protagonist and narrator), Tome Hayashi (Rosie's mother and a haiku poet), Mr. Hayashi (Rosie's father and a farmer), Jesus Carrasco (Rosie's love interest and a farm worker), Mr. and Mrs. Hayano (the Hayashis' friends and neighbors), Haru, Natsu, Aki, and Fuyu (the Hayano sisters), Taka and Gimpachi (Rosie's aunt and uncle). ## Analysis of "Seventeen Syllables" - Analyze the title and its significance: The title refers to the form of haiku poetry, which consists of seventeen syllables in three lines. It also symbolizes the gap between Rosie and her mother, who speak different languages and have different cultural backgrounds. - Analyze the setting and its impact: The story is set in rural Southern California before World War II, which reflects the historical reality of Japanese American immigration and discrimination. The tomato farm represents both the hard work and isolation of the Japanese American community. - Analyze the point of view and its effect: The story is told from Rosie's limited perspective, which creates a sense of intimacy and empathy with her character. However, it also limits the reader's understanding of other characters' thoughts and feelings, especially Tome's. - Analyze the conflict and its resolution: The main conflict in the story is between Rosie and her mother, who have different expectations and aspirations for their lives. Rosie wants to assimilate into American society and pursue her own happiness, while Tome wants to preserve her Japanese identity and culture through her haiku. The conflict is resolved when Tome tells Rosie her tragic past and asks her not to marry, which makes Rosie realize how much her mother has sacrificed for her. ## Conclusion - Restate the thesis statement: "Seventeen Syllables" is a powerful story that explores the issues of language, communication, identity, and gender in the context of Japanese American history and culture. - Summarize the main points of the article: The article provides a summary and analysis of the story, focusing on its title, setting, point of view, conflict, and resolution. - Provide some implications or recommendations for further reading: The story can be seen as a reflection of Yamamoto's own experiences as a Japanese American woman who faced discrimination and internment during World War II. The story can also be compared to other works by Yamamoto or other Asian American authors who deal with similar themes. ## FAQs - Q: Where can I download a pdf version of "Seventeen Syllables"? - A: You can download a pdf version of "Seventeen Syllables" from this link: https://www.sjsu.edu/faculty/harris/ENGL_1B_Readings/Yamamoto_Seventeen_Syllables.pdf - Q: What are some other stories by Hisaye Yamamoto that I can read? - A: Some other stories by Hisaye Yamamoto that you can read are "Yoneko's Earthquake", "The Legend of Miss Sasagawara", "Wilshire Bus", "The Brown House", and "Epithalamium". - Q: What are some other sources that I can use to learn more about Hisaye Yamamoto and her work? - A: Some other sources that you can use to learn more about Hisaye Yamamoto and her work are: - King-Kok Cheung, ed. Words Matter: Conversations with Asian American Writers. Honolulu: University of Hawai'i Press, 2000. - King-Kok Cheung. Articulate Silences: Hisaye Yamamoto, Maxine Hong Kingston, Joy Kogawa. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1993. - Traise Yamamoto. "Hisaye Yamamoto." In Asian American Novelists: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook, edited by Emmanuel S. Nelson, 379-386. Westport: Greenwood Press, 2000. - Q: What are some other examples of haiku poetry that I can read? - A: Some other examples of haiku poetry that you can read are: - Matsuo Basho: "An old pond / A frog jumps in / The sound of water" - Kobayashi Issa: "The snow is melting / And the village is flooded / With children" - Yosa Buson: "Lighting one candle / With another candle / Spring evening" - Q: What are some other literary works that deal with the theme of cultural conflict between generations? - A: Some other literary works that deal with the theme of cultural conflict between generations are: - Amy Tan. The Joy Luck Club. New York: Penguin Books, 1989. - Jhumpa Lahiri. The Namesake. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2003. - Sandra Cisneros. The House on Mango Street. New York: Vintage Books, 1984.




Hisaye Yamamoto Seventeen Syllables Pdf Download

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